Nicky Rhodes

Interdisciplinary designer / maker / thinker with an academic background in the intersections of architecture, society, and the environment, and a foundation in the arts. I strive to craft spaces that connect people with their community, their ecosystem, and themselves.

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Bus Stop

HAVERFORD, PA – I co-designed and managed all phases of building a Bus Stop & Bike Shelter, from raising funds to overseeing construction. This project, which I completed as a junior at Haverford College, succeeds in encouraging sustainable student transportation on campus.

  • PROJECTS

    Greenhouse Open House
  • I co-designed and managed all phases of building a Bus Stop & Bike Shelter, from raising funds to overseeing construction. This project, which I completed as a junior at Haverford College, succeeds in encouraging sustainable student transportation.

    The project began when a friend and I got caught in the rain while waiting for the bus. We approached Haverford with a shelter design, then spent the following year working to conceive the structure.

    Learning that Haverford's Committee for Environmental Sustainability was planning a bike-share program, we joined forces and devised a multimodal transportation hub. Study model in Revit.

    The design was inspired by Philadelphia's eclectic late nineteenth-century regional rail stations, and guided by Haverford's Quaker principles of simplicity and integrity. Study model in Revit.

    Stepped to follow the site's gentle slope, the building is divided into three spaces: The front waiting area opens to the bus route; behind this, the bike-share bay faces the adjacent pedestrian walkway; in the rear, an exterior bicycle maintenance station faces campus. Study model in Revit.

    Construction documents in AutoCAD.

    Craftsmen from the Amish community in Lancaster County, PA, who perpetuate the skills of traditional timber framing, prefabricated the structure at their workshop and then erected it on campus in three days.

    Craftsmen from the Amish community in Lancaster County, PA, who perpetuate the skills of traditional timber framing, prefabricated the structure at their workshop and then erected it on campus in three days.

    The posts, beams, and angled braces are hewn from eastern hemlock and joined with hand-driven trunnels. The board-and-batten siding is of pine.

    The building houses Haverford's new bike-share program, providing a bicycle maintenance station to promote low-carbon transportation.

    Located next to dense student housing, the building has become integrated into the daily patterns of student life, effectively serving the hundreds of travelers who use it daily.

    The bench in the waiting area was cut from a fallen Red Oak on campus.